On Jogging and Donuts

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by: Richelle Torres

03/16/2021

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On Jogging and Donuts

by Dr. David Sylvester

 Before we were married, I thought I was buff and healthy. Apparently not.

 I often had pizza for breakfast - and why not? It was good.  Dinner was a choice between KFC and Dairy Queen; it was a small town, really small. Our quarterback was also head cheerleader which was awkward. After the wedding, my new wife’s mission was to turn me into a healthy and vibrant being, a veritable fountain of youth with beautiful and perfect blood tests, to use a Trumpism. One of her first meals featured grass-fed broccoli, organic lettuce, rainwater from the Amazon forests, and baked tree bark with a twist of cinnamon, or close to that. Not very tasty.

Working Out

I signed on for a membership at a health club and did a little cardio on a bicycle for a couple of days but they moved it upstairs - I had to quit. Membership featured a complimentary session with a ripped trainer who forced me to soldier on after completing two toe raises and a sit-up. I felt pain like no human ever has and reported the trainer to the authorities for abuse.  This proud trainer was muscled up, sported a chiseled jaw, could bench press a rhino, and reminded me of Chewbaca. She made gurgling sounds when she lifted something. I thought she was mean.

Yes, healthcare is a big deal! And so is health care and caring for the health of others.

Healthcare

Each year, the United States spends an average of more than $8200 per person on healthcare, according to the Meritage Medical Network, a community of 760+ physicians. In 1960, the number was $1082. We are becoming less healthy with every bite and every long nap on the sofa. Physicians tell us that near 75% of health care dollars are spent on diseases that are potentially preventable such as diabetes, obesity, lung disease, etc. And to boot, the number one culprit causing financial ruin is the back-breaking cost of health care which shoves almost two million Americans through the doors of bankruptcy every year! A sad commentary, indeed.

The Best Kind

In the pages of scripture, we learn that the famed traveler and missionary Paul had some physical issues he lived with. He complained of a “thorn in the flesh” that never seemed to go away and further wrote in Galatians of his bodily illness, as he termed it at which others might wince or recoil, suggesting it was no pretty sight. God treated him with grace. Paul was often roughed up, arrested, pelted with rocks, and hungry as he preached the gospel – and a wise man was he to have Dr. Luke as his traveling companion. Apparently, it’s a good idea to have a doctor on hand if rocks to the back are the payment for a good sermon! I’ve received a few boos, but no rocks……yet. In the early days of New Testament life, people cared for and served one another, as should we.  

 It is apparent that the most valuable and necessary commodity today is health insurance, but the stark reality is this warm blanket of medical security is increasingly expensive and unaffordable to many, even topping $2000 monthly for some families. And some insurance only covers about as much as those skimpy hospital gowns! Liberal political candidates have insisted that coverage for all ought to be provided by the federal government as a deserved and rightful benefit. That cost to the federal budget is now estimated at near $34 trillion over a period of ten years, a figure that rivals the annual federal budget but apparently mere chump change if it buys a few votes. And who pays for it? I’ll give you one guess.

 Care Well

Yes, we should take care of our bodies with a healthy diet, exercise and properly honoring our bodies as “temples of the Holy Spirit”, as the apostle Paul taught. However, the stark reality is that illness may strike without warning and with no apparent cause which should motivate each of us to lend a helping hand, show compassion, and write a check to the one struggling. The first-century church never heard of health insurance, except the kind that came by caring for one another. They were insured by compassion and fellowship and were assured they would never suffer alone. What a novel idea.

 Watch the Donuts

I heard of one fellow who jogs a mile every single day – all the way to Krispy Krème Donuts. He is convinced the jog and the donut cancel one another. I pray earnestly and without ceasing and claim the promise in faith that he is correct.  And if you plan to shove down donuts but have no intention of jogging a mile, at least wear ankle weights while sleeping – hey, it’s a start.

Watch the donuts - and take care of someone today. They need it and so do you. And I still don’t like the mean trainer. Just a thought.

 David Sylvester
Executive Pastor/Operations

On Jogging and Donuts

by Dr. David Sylvester

 Before we were married, I thought I was buff and healthy. Apparently not.

 I often had pizza for breakfast - and why not? It was good.  Dinner was a choice between KFC and Dairy Queen; it was a small town, really small. Our quarterback was also head cheerleader which was awkward. After the wedding, my new wife’s mission was to turn me into a healthy and vibrant being, a veritable fountain of youth with beautiful and perfect blood tests, to use a Trumpism. One of her first meals featured grass-fed broccoli, organic lettuce, rainwater from the Amazon forests, and baked tree bark with a twist of cinnamon, or close to that. Not very tasty.

Working Out

I signed on for a membership at a health club and did a little cardio on a bicycle for a couple of days but they moved it upstairs - I had to quit. Membership featured a complimentary session with a ripped trainer who forced me to soldier on after completing two toe raises and a sit-up. I felt pain like no human ever has and reported the trainer to the authorities for abuse.  This proud trainer was muscled up, sported a chiseled jaw, could bench press a rhino, and reminded me of Chewbaca. She made gurgling sounds when she lifted something. I thought she was mean.

Yes, healthcare is a big deal! And so is health care and caring for the health of others.

Healthcare

Each year, the United States spends an average of more than $8200 per person on healthcare, according to the Meritage Medical Network, a community of 760+ physicians. In 1960, the number was $1082. We are becoming less healthy with every bite and every long nap on the sofa. Physicians tell us that near 75% of health care dollars are spent on diseases that are potentially preventable such as diabetes, obesity, lung disease, etc. And to boot, the number one culprit causing financial ruin is the back-breaking cost of health care which shoves almost two million Americans through the doors of bankruptcy every year! A sad commentary, indeed.

The Best Kind

In the pages of scripture, we learn that the famed traveler and missionary Paul had some physical issues he lived with. He complained of a “thorn in the flesh” that never seemed to go away and further wrote in Galatians of his bodily illness, as he termed it at which others might wince or recoil, suggesting it was no pretty sight. God treated him with grace. Paul was often roughed up, arrested, pelted with rocks, and hungry as he preached the gospel – and a wise man was he to have Dr. Luke as his traveling companion. Apparently, it’s a good idea to have a doctor on hand if rocks to the back are the payment for a good sermon! I’ve received a few boos, but no rocks……yet. In the early days of New Testament life, people cared for and served one another, as should we.  

 It is apparent that the most valuable and necessary commodity today is health insurance, but the stark reality is this warm blanket of medical security is increasingly expensive and unaffordable to many, even topping $2000 monthly for some families. And some insurance only covers about as much as those skimpy hospital gowns! Liberal political candidates have insisted that coverage for all ought to be provided by the federal government as a deserved and rightful benefit. That cost to the federal budget is now estimated at near $34 trillion over a period of ten years, a figure that rivals the annual federal budget but apparently mere chump change if it buys a few votes. And who pays for it? I’ll give you one guess.

 Care Well

Yes, we should take care of our bodies with a healthy diet, exercise and properly honoring our bodies as “temples of the Holy Spirit”, as the apostle Paul taught. However, the stark reality is that illness may strike without warning and with no apparent cause which should motivate each of us to lend a helping hand, show compassion, and write a check to the one struggling. The first-century church never heard of health insurance, except the kind that came by caring for one another. They were insured by compassion and fellowship and were assured they would never suffer alone. What a novel idea.

 Watch the Donuts

I heard of one fellow who jogs a mile every single day – all the way to Krispy Krème Donuts. He is convinced the jog and the donut cancel one another. I pray earnestly and without ceasing and claim the promise in faith that he is correct.  And if you plan to shove down donuts but have no intention of jogging a mile, at least wear ankle weights while sleeping – hey, it’s a start.

Watch the donuts - and take care of someone today. They need it and so do you. And I still don’t like the mean trainer. Just a thought.

 David Sylvester
Executive Pastor/Operations

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